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Diamond 4 C's

History Of Diamonds

Diamonds have a long history as beautiful objects of desire. In the first century AD, the Roman naturalist Pliny stated: “Diamond is the most valuable, not only of precious stones, but of all things in this world.”

A diamond has to go through a lot before it reaches the jeweler’s display case. It forms deep in the earth under extreme heat and pressure. It’s ejected violently upward until it arrives at or near the earth’s surface. It’s forced from its hiding place by nature or by man. Then it’s cleaved and cut and polished until its natural beauty shines through.

The world’s love of diamonds had its start in India, where diamonds were gathered from the country’s rivers and streams. Some historians estimate that India was trading in diamonds as early as the fourth century BC. The country’s resources yielded limited quantities for an equally limited market: India’s very wealthy classes. Gradually, though, this changed. Indian diamonds found their way, along with other exotic merchandise, to Western Europe in the caravans that traveled to Venice’s medieval markets. By the 1400s, diamonds were becoming fashionable accessories for Europe’s elite.

Diamonds, among the rarest materials on earth, are minerals and the hardest naturally occurring transparent crystalline substances found.Incredibly, it is the only gemstone made of just one element, carbon – in its purest form.

Each diamond is the result of an extraordinary voyage, turning this natural element into the world’s most sought-after jewel.

Diamonds are forged hundreds of kilometers below the earth’s surface. Extreme heat and pressure caused fragments of carbon to form into diamond crystals. Miraculously, diamonds are brought up to the surface by a volcano.

Clarity

Since diamonds form under tremendous heat and pressure, internal and external characteristics are common. These characteristics help gemologists separate natural diamonds from synthetics and simulants, and identify individual stones.There are two types of clarity characteristics: inclusions and blemishes. The difference is based on their locations: inclusions are inside the diamond while blemishes are only on its surface.

Carat

Carat is the standard unit of weight for diamonds and other gemstones. One carat equals one fifth of a gram. When weighing less than one carat, the diamond’s weight is expressed in “points”: each carat is divided into 100 points, for example: 0,50 carat = 50 points. 0,3 carat = 30. Diamond prices increase exponentially with carat weight. So, a 1-carat diamond of a given quality is always worth more than two 0.50-carat diamonds of the same quality.

Cut

Since diamonds form under tremendous heat and pressure, internal and external characteristics are common. These characteristics help gemologists separate natural diamonds from synthetics and simulants, and identify individual stones.

There are two types of clarity characteristics: inclusions and blemishes. The difference is based on their locations: inclusions are inside the diamond while blemishes are only on its surface.

Colour

Most gem quality diamonds used in jewelry are colorless and nearly colorless, sometimes with tints of yellow or brown. Among the rarest are the colors D, E and F on a scale that goes to Z. Color grades are established by comparing each diamond to a set of master comparison diamonds. Each grade represents a range of color. Grading color is done in a specific and controlled lighting environment and according to strict color grading procedures. More color intensity than Z is called “fancy” color. Diamonds of all colors can be found in nature: over 300 colors have so far been identified, however these come in an infinite number of shades and hues.

Diamond 4 C's